Ultimate Guideline – How to Use a Red Dot Sight

Introduction:

Shooting accuracy is vital when you want to hit the target every time you aim. At times, as you train, it is not possible to do that without some guidance – the red dot sight. We have seen them in movies and in practice too helping the users aim better at moderate ranges.
It is a simple optic instrument that uses an LED light to point where you are aiming. In simple terms, it uses the red dot as the reticle.
The dot can be green or red depending on the model you are using. They are however all referred to as red dots to avoid complication. Once you learn how to use the red dot properly, it becomes of the best companions as you train to shoot on the target.

Red Dot Sights General Instructions

As long as you have a gun with a mounting rail, check what works with your weapon and then follow the mounting considerations below. For example, if you compare vortex venom and viper red dot sights, the venom series is bigger which makes it mountable on rifles and pistols. The Viper model is suitable for pistols and smaller guns due to its small size.
If you need magnification, then you will need a scope that will help you do that since red dot sights do not magnify. They were invented in the 70s to help people aim while they use the gun. Since then, the modification has seen them achieve more regarding the quality and longevity of use before changing the batteries. That is why you are now seeing smaller ones, mountable on handguns.
How you mount the aiming instrument is upon you. The pistols will keep it straight while larger guns may require some inclination depending on how you hold while using it. What will work for you will not work for your partner.
Guns were there since before this generation, but technology has made most people to consider the flat-top Picatinny railing. Models from the Vortex brand, for example, will use that properly.
However, you are at times given the gun available to work with. At that point, the only thing to do if you need proper mounting is getting a cheek weld to hold the red dot sight as you shoot. There will be some limitations though.

How to Mount a Red Dot Scope?

It is not always an easy decision when figuring out the best position for your dot sight or scope. If that does not seem evident to you depending on what you are using, look at the where you don’t need it first.
The first thing you need to avoid is mounting on the handguard. Some guns have been modified to make that possible and unless that is possible on your weapon, don’t do it.
The typical types have the handguard surrounding the chamber and barrel, and these are the areas that get heated up as you shoot. That means the metal on guard will expand due to heat subjection, and that will affect your zero if the scope is attached to it. The degree of zero shifting will, however, depend on how much the handguard will be affected by the heat.
The rule to follow is mounting on top of the receiver. Are you including a magnifier, then choose a mounting style that will match that if you don’t have space or get a smaller sighting scope. The only exception to consider mounting on the handguard is if the gun incorporates a monolithic upper where the receiver and handguard are one piece.

Considerations When Mounting A Red Dot Sight

  • If you need to include a magnifier, then make sure your mounting procedure does not limit you on space. Otherwise, you need to mount it further forward.
  • Regardless of where you mount, the red dot’s size will not be affected by that. Moving it forward or back does not make it larger either.
  • When mounting, consider the optic being closer to you instead of further. At times, as you shoot, you get the ‘searching’ mode where you need to locate the dot before shooting. It happens mostly if you had a cheek weld. When it’s further, the ‘window’ appears smaller, and it will take time before you get used to it. Handguns mounting brings it close to you as possible. For larger guns, choose a position closer to your eye.
  • Some of us like it when the optic is further from the eye. At that point, you can shoot well than when it is closer to your face. The reason behind this (though it differs with the different models) is that your eye views things correctly positioned at a further distance since the interpretation is in your eye and not the spot guiding instrument.
  • Mounting closer to the eye gives you a wide field of view, but you will see less when looking around. When the sighting optics is further from your eye, the FOV is smaller, and you have more viewing on the outer parts of the red sight optic. If you are shooting at longer ranges, then a wide FOV is necessary. When shooting at short ranges, then you need a view that sees through the sighting scope and over the top edges. Such a view is suitable if you are searching a building, for example.
  • As you mount, consider the balancing your rifle. Handguns will work well if the sighting optic’s weight is subjected at the rear and not further forward. On larger guns, weight at the front can help you deal with muzzle flip. The main point here is to check your weapon and how it works when the masses are in different positions

Adjusting and Sighting a Red Dot Scope

Since we are using the long guns and short ones too, we are going to see how you can do it on AR and smaller guns option. The instructions will vary depending on your gun but here is the generalization on what you need to consider.

AR Rifles

They come with a Picatinny rail, so mounting is easy. Once everything is in position, you need to check the zeroing distance. Some of us will use 50 yards zero point since it is also applicable at 200 yards.
If you think about the bullet’s arc, it will go up at 50 yards before going back to your zero at 200 yards. Others will go with 25 yards, but whatever choice you make, the method does not change.
Now, if your rifle has that iron sighting fixture, then you are better than the rest of your peers in the group.
Just adjust the elevation and windage on the sighting optics until you get the dot sitting straight at the top of the iron sight’s front post. After you center the dot, it’s now time to shoot a few rounds with both eyes opened.
If you are not yet on target, then adjust the optics properly and do it one more time until you are happy with the results.
Now, if you don’t have the iron sight advantage, there is still the old-fashioned way of going the boresight method.
Place the upper on a steady platform after removing it from the lower, and dispatching the charging handle and bolt too. Once you have done that, it is now possible to look down the barrel as you aim at the target.
After achieving the distance needed, move the upper until you get the dot centered on where you are aiming. Look again down the barrel to see if the upper moved as you were working on the sighting. If they are not in line, you need to readjust the barrel and target then go back to the sighting.
When everything is assembled, and you have already taken a deep breath, send a few rounds down and then adjust accordingly depending on the point of impact.

Handguns Sighting

Mounting on handguns is easy since most of them come with the necessary mechanism to make that possible. Once the mounting is successful, all you need to do is adjust the dot until it seems to sit on top of the iron sight’s front. With your paper target in position, move back at 5 yards and shoot three or four rounds. Are you on target? Go back to your adjustment knobs and sight again. Now, fire again until you hit the impact point.
Once you get it right at 5 yards, now move to a further distance, say 15 yards. The zeroing at such a point will differ from five yards. After you have the proper sighting, shoot again and confirm your target. Repeat the adjustments you made at five yards and shoot again until you have the desired results after shooting.

Footnote

A red dot sight will help you more in shooting on target, and the modern ones will typically fit on any new gun in use. Whether you have a handgun or rifle, the mounting mechanisms are there to aid you in better sighting and to shoot at the aimed point. Most of them do not have magnifiers since they are made to help you get your target and not magnifying your view.
For those of us with advanced ones that have a magnifying glass, such versatility helps those who are shooting at longer ranges – 50 or 75 yards. On the other hand, if you are not doing the long distance shooting, then having a red dot will help you hit your targets more and waste less ammunition.

For those of us with advanced ones that have a magnifying glasses, such versatility helps those who are shooting at longer ranges – 50 or 75 yards. On the other hand, if you are not doing the long distance shooting, then having a red dot will help you hit your targets more and waste less ammunition. If you’re on the market looking for the best rated red dot sight, you can go to the OutdoorsBest.com and check out their article here: Best Red Dot Sight – { Top 8 } Red Dot Reflex Sight Review

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